Carol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WaytCarol WayteeCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WCarol WayteayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol
WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol WayteCarol Wayte
Below are excerpts by Carol Staley from "Scarves
International Magazine" in 1989 with her thoughts
about scarves and  -

SCARF PEOPLE

"Is there a scarf personality?  Certain women
respond to the allure of a beautiful scarf the way the
tides are pulled by the moon --
they can't resist.  I'm
not talking about the woman who ties a kerchief to
cover her hair rollers en route to the supermarket.  
Or the person who bundles up with a muffler to ward
off the chill of winter.  I'm speaking of the woman who
sees a scarf not as function but fashion.

Just as there is the woman who wouldn't dream of
going out without enveloping herself in a view of
perfume, there is the woman who wouldn't consider
herself dressed unless she tossed a swarth of silk
around her neck.  For, like perfume, the scarf is a
signature of style, a flag signalling the wearer's dash
and individuality.  Indeed, the gesture of whipping a
length of cashmere over one' shoulder is nothing
less than grand.  And the eloquence of such a move
is not lost on the scarf devotee.  Something of the
theatrical beats in the breast of practically every
woman - and man - who has donned a scarf.

Who can picture the soignee Parisienne turned out in
her perfect little suit, beautifully coiffed and
bejeweled, without the exquisite expensive cut of
fabric that sits just so, across her elegant
shoulders?  This woman brandishes her scarf with
elan.

Scarves also have infinite appeal for ... the well-bred
equestrienne, for example with her scarf knotted in a
classic ascot tucked neatly into her riding ensemble.  
With a scarf, the wearer is flying her own colors at
will.  A scarf can be a discreet bit of color peeking out
of her collar, or a blaze of glory unfurling behind bare
shoulders.

Among the scarf personalities we count the demure
and the daring, the traditionalist and the
avant-garde.  The way a woman wears a scarf tells
all.  Wrapping a simple straw hat with a scarf that
trails down the back like a school girl's ribbon
expresses charm and innocence.  A transparent fling
of organza over a slip of a little black dress has
glamour written all over it.  You can spot the true
adventurer by the way she turns her scarves into
bustiers, belts, sarongs and exotic headwraps.

It seems that the impulse towards wearing a scarf has
to do with how far one is willing to go with fashion as
self-expression. . . The decision to wear this
particular accessory is a matter of comfort and
confidence.  She may be at ease with jewelery.  After
all, earrings stay clipped, bracelets clasped, watches
strapped, an belts buckled.  But a scarf has a life of
its own and requires a little mastery, some sleight of
hand on the part of the wearer.

Perhaps this is the clue to the scarf personality - that
she can take a piece of cloth and turn it into her
personal statement alluding to her creativity and
ingenuity.  Rather than leaving well enough alone,
the scarf afficionado is compelled to make it better,
take it to the limit.  The scarf wearer knows that with a
scarf on her person she is irresistibly feminine and
yet invincible, impervious to the barbs of bad taste
that assault our sensibilities on these mean streets.  
The scarf becomes a kind of armor, if you will,
insulating the wearer from the dinginess and
dreariness of the ordinary.  And it is always correct.  
With a scarf, you can be sure you are well-dressed."
"For, like perfume,
the scarf is a
signature of style, a
flag signalling the
wearer's dash and
individuality."

"You can spot the
true adventurer by
the way she turns
her scarves into
bustiers, belts,
sarongs and exotic
headwraps."

"Perhaps this is the
clue to the scarf
personality - that
she can take a piece
of cloth and turn it
into her personal
statement alluding
to her creativity and
ingenuity. "

"The scarf becomes
a kind of armor, if
you will, insulating
the wearer from the
dinginess and
dreariness of the
ordinary."
REMEMBER . . .

Scarves are the most versatile accessory in your wardrobe - they can    
move from the neck, to the head, to the waist - depending on your mood!

Cleverly used, scarves can draw attention away from little faults, minimize
figure problems and bring attention to more attractive aspects of your figure.

A bright scarf in the right colors adds a splash of excitement, updates an
"older" wardrobe, and gives new life to outfits in the wrong colors.

AND

Our Fiberlicious Scarves need only be draped around your
         shoulders with no scarf-tying ability required.